Elly Kleinman

Elly Kleinman was born in a traditional Jewish family in 1959 in New York. He had a very tight relationship with his family, thus forming a permanent worship towards his religion and family values. At a very small age he saw the true light of the communit
Elly Kleinman was born in a traditional Jewish family in 1959 in New York. He had a very tight relationship with his family, thus forming a permanent worship towards his religion and family values. At a very small age he saw the true light of the communit

Kleinman, E. - How to Fight Aging in the Brain

Illustration for article titled Kleinman, E. - How to Fight Aging in the Brain

Emerging technologies have changed the way we fight and deal with diseases. Our brains are the most important and most complex organs. Until this day the brain and its function, remains a big unsolved mystery, with so many things left to be discovered. Elly Kleinman, Americare Companies founder has been actively involved in the healthcare industry for over three decades. As he explains, in the past couple of years, medicine has gone through the biggest transformation. Thanks to the development of technology, healthcare providers have been able to record progress in almost every field of medicine.

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Most of you probably know that brain cells change as we get old. That means that as we grow older various genes become more or less active, and molecules that are neatly compartmentalized in young cells, become scattered and disorganized. But with the advancement of technology scientists were able to come up with a way to transform ordinary skin cells into aging human neurons. Using stem-cell technology, in the past scientists were able to create neurons in a dish. But as Elly Kleinman further explains, those efforts produced the equivalent of embryonic neurons. By taking skin cells from donors of different ages and transforming them into neurons that retain the effects of aging, scientists opened up new avenues for studying aging and age-associated diseases. With that comes the possibility that drugs might save what was once was thought to be inevitable.

These kinds of results are obviously going the make a deep impact on medicine. In fact, not only will they advance research into aging but as Elly Kleinman believes they could also help in creating new cells that could replace damaged tissues or organs. Findings of this proportion could potentially address major problems in several fields. People worldwide are eager to discover how this can affect the way our brains age, and hopefully bring some new perspective in the fight against Alzheimer’s and other brain related diseases. The reason why there hasn’t been any significant progress made in this field is because of the so many unknown factors.

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